Walking


Main Walks (Normally 4-6 miles)
1 per month, on the second Tuesday of every month. Meeting point (for car sharing etc) at Lostwithiel Community Centre



Short Walks (Normally 3-4 miles)
1 per month, on the last Tuesday of every month. Meeting point at Lostwithiel Community Centre


For both Long and Short Walks please meet at the Community Centre  from 10.15a.m to leave at 10.30a.m.

Looking forward to seeing you all, plus volunteers as Walk Coordinators and any suggestions/ideas for our programme.

Future walk dates. Please let Chris or Janet ( 01208 871784) know if you would like to organise a walk.


REPORTS FROM THE FIRST HALF OF 2017 AVAILABLE HERE


REPORTS FROM THE SECOND HALF OF 2017 AVAILABLE HERE




UPDATE 3RD AUGUST  2018 

REPORT OF WALK ON THE 31st JULY 2018

ST. NEWLYN EAST AND LAPPA VALLEY


Another excellent turn out of 17 with a new member for this 4 mile moderate/easy walk along minor roads, footpaths, tracks and fields around the lovely town of St. Newlyn East with its shop, post office, pub, church and butcher and double decker buses to Truro and Newquay.

After a ten minute walk by the side of allotments and through some residential development we arrived ,as promised, to our tea,coffee, rum stop at the Pheasant Inn.

Thanks go to Anne who provided a slice of Trench Cake for us all to enjoy and enjoy we all did.With some using the outdoor seating and others inside it was not until nearly 12.00 noon that we set off and unfortunately went wrong according to our instructions, only to find out that we could have carried on as we were; good job that most did not notice.

Some minor road walking before we reach a right hand turn and into woods with a stream running by the side of the path. The stream's bed is coloured red due to precipitated iron hydroxides colouring the water and sticking to anything in the watercourse. As we walk along we can hear train whistles and children playing in the near by Lappa Valley which has 7.25 inch, 10.25 inch and 15 inch gauge railways running around the site; a treat for our train spotters.

To our left we could also see the site of a large mine complex with engine house and chimney rising above the site; the remains of the East Wheal Rose lead mine opened in 1835.

Crossing a road we now head along a public footpath, past a wetland area and uphill towards our picnic spot with extended views back to St Newlyn East and with four giant wind turbines behind us.

The leader had forgotten his camera so got into a photo at last as Sue used her mobile phone as a back up.


https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/853/43109632164_3d3a7e2c67.jpg

(Click on image for enlarged view)


Heading now down hill and through recently cut straw bales, worth a considerable sum today as the dry conditions have stunted growth and increased the need for feed.

We also cross the old track way of the Newquay to Truro line closed in 1963 and stopping at Perranporth and Mitchell and Newlyn East on route.

Through a farm complex and along a track we are soon back onto a minor road and past the St Newlyn East Learning Academy and public toilets and back to the car park

Permission had been granted to park in the large Village Hall car park.

One of us returned to the butchers to purchase two frozen pasties as part of his Pasty Project and also some traditional pork sausage-which at the time of writing had just been eaten for lunch and very good too-it may become a regular venue.

The next walk will be the Lostwithiel Town Trail on the morning of Tuesday 28th August.  So far 20 have signed up-we are also planning to have lunch locally for those who want-more news on venue nearer the event.



UPDATE 24TH JULY 2018 


    NOTICE OF WALK ON 31ST JULY

           ST NEWLYN EAST AND LAPPA VALLEY


Lappa Valley
Image  Credit:  Some rights reserved by marksimpkins


1) 4 MILE EASY/MODERATE CIRCULAR WALK USING PATHS,FIELDS,MINOR ROADS AND TRACKS WITH SOME STILES

2) WE PLAN TO MEET AT COMMUNITY CENTRE AT 10.15AM FOR 10.20AM DEPARTURE

3) TEA,COFFEE,RUM ETC STOP AT ABOUT 11.10AM 

4) PLEASE BRING PICNIC FOR LUNCH BREAK- RETURNING AT ABOUT 3.00/3.30PM

5) WE WILL PARK IN ST NEWLYN EAST-DETAILS TO BE CONFIRMED

6) A MUST FOR ANY TRAIN SPOTTER!


COULD YOU LET US KNOW BY SATURDAY 28TH JULY IF YOU WISH TO GO ON THE WALK AND IF YOU CAN OFFER TRANSPORT

OUR NEXT WALK,APART FROM HISTORIC LOSTWITHIEL ON 28TH AUGUST, WILL BE ON 11TH SEPTEMBER

REGARDS AND HAVE A GOOD AUGUST,

CHRIS AND JANET

PS SOME OF US ENJOY THE BRADOC WALK WHICH NORMALLY TAKES PLACE ON THE AUGUST BANK HOLIDAY WITH PLENTY OF CAKES AND SCONES.






UPDATE 20TH JULY 2018 

WALK IN AUGUST

As most of you know we do not usually do a formal group walk in August but in 2018 we have decided to do an "Historic Walk around Lostwithiel" with one of the experienced guide in town.



This will take place on the morning of Tuesday 28th August and will probably finish with a light lunch somewhere for those who wish to participate. The walk will take about 1.5-2 hours at a cost each of £3.50.

In order to get a slot in the programme we need to have some idea of numbers.

Could you let me know by 31st July if you would be interested.

We will be holding our short July walk on 31st July and details will be available in due course.

Regards,

Chris and Janet



UPDATE 14TH JULY 2018

                          

  REPORT OF WALK ON THE 10TH JULY

                                CRANTOCK AND THE GANNEL

 

Sixteen of us met at the NT Car Park at Crantock Beach on a dry sunny day but with a slight cooling wind to help us over the next 5 miles. This circular walk takes us along the Gannel Estuary and then back over fields to the start which meant that tide times had to be considered when deciding the best time to start.


The tide was almost fully out when we started the walk along side the estuary with the large houses overlooking the other bank. The name of this river is from the Cornish An Ganel meaning “the channel”. Since the closure of the mines and with water quality greatly improved,  the river now supports wildlife including salmon and the now endangered European eel.


We followed the coast path towards Penpol-yet another one- a settlement which was recorded in 1216 and is Cornish for “top of the creek”. After passing some rope swings-well some of us didn't just pass we tried it out-we followed the field line until we reached a concrete path and turned left to get onto the sand and the estuary. We were told in our instructions that the mud deposits provide a habitat for marsh samphire and that is exactly what we found all along the estuary. Two completely unrelated plants both known as samphire grow in Cornwall the rock samphire and the one we found the marsh samphire. As we were having Bream for tea it made a useful addition as a seasoning.


After just over an hour,  we decided to have a slight detour to have lunch in Trenance

Gardens and some indulged in cake(s) and cream teas whilst we watched the ducks on the boating lake.


Resuming our walk to retrace our steps over the estuary and then up Penpole Path and through fields of barley suffering from the lack of rain and a settlement of Treyungy

to a footpath signed Crantock and a wonderful old tree to sit on for a rest and a photo opportunity.

 

 

https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/942/29677336338_d1c42a14f8_h.jpg
Click on above image for larger view


Continuing across a wooden walkway,  we again crossed fields some with cattle and two kissing gates either side of a small lane and one with horses all covered up against the flies and back to Crantock village. Whilst some used the facilities and others had ice creams,  Annie very kindly took two groups to see the high church of  St Carantoc, a Norman church which boasts some of the finest wood carvings in the West Country and is a popular venue for wedding couples.


A short walk now down to the car park and another walk which few had completed previously and one to be recommended.



*************************

  WALK ON THE 10TH JULY

             CRANTOCK AND THE GANNEL

 

1) 5 MILE MODERATE CIRCULAR WALK ON TRACKS, FOOTPATH, ESTUARY,FARMLAND AND MINOR ROADS

2) WE SHALL BE PARKING AT NATIONAL TRUST'S CRANTOCK BEACH CAR PARK -WILL MEMBERS PLEASE BRING THEIR CARDS

3) FACILITIES AVAILABLE AT CRANTOCK AND AT OUR PICNIC LUNCH SPOT WHERE DRINKS AND CAKES ALSO AVAILABLE.

4) PLEASE BRING DRINK AND SUN CREAM IF THIS HEAT WAVE CONTINUES INTO NEXT WEEK.

WE SHALL BE MEETING AT COMMUNITY CENTRE AT 9.55AM FOR 10.00AM DEPARTURE.

PLEASE LET US KNOW BY SATURDAY 7TH JULY IF YOU WANT TO COME AND IF YOU CAN OFFER TRANSPORT.

REGARDS,

CHRIS AND JANET



UPDATE JULY 2018


REPORT OF WALK ON THE 26TH JUNE

TO WHEAL MARTYN CLAY WORKS AND BACK


On a very sunny day sixteen of us met on Tremena Road in St Austell to walk the 3.5 miles from there to see one of the sites of the fascinating china clay story and back with some drinks and food in between.

The cycle and footpath was very well shaded and gave some protection from the sun as we walked on a good surface,none of the mud that we are used to, towards the mine at Wheal Martyn. The site is a must for locals and holiday makers as it gives a great insight into one of the major industries in Cornwall and explains some of the contours we see as we drive and walk about the area.

A good web site www.wheal-martyn.com explains all about the events/history etc. but better still visit the real thing.

Our first point of call was the café and we all had a drink before the majority visited the museum. We were very lucky that John and Sue used to work for the company who ran the site English China Clays, ECC, the company was acquired in 1999 by Imetal a French organisation who subsequently changed their name to Imerys.

So along with all the explanation boards we had expert knowledge of the process and markets from John and a photograph of Sue and articles written by Sue to admire.

We were taken to the top of the mine to see the land now being worked by the very large diggers and lorries taking the material to the processing site and an ideal place for our first photograph.




Walking down the trail again and past settling tanks and working water wheels, old vehicles and blacksmiths areas we proceeded to our lunch in the café and met up with those who had a more leisurely morning.


https://c2.staticflickr.com/2/1761/43504256382_1d3ddd99cb_b.jpg
(Click on above image for larger view)


One more photograph including some static white characters we met outside the entrance we made our way back along the the same path to our cars and the short trip home having learnt a lot about the clay industry, a pleasant short walk and as usual plenty of chat and some bad jokes.



UPDATE 14TH JUNE 2018

  WALK ON THE 26TH JUNE

               TO WHEAL MARTYN AND CLAY TRAIL

1) 3.5 mile easy walk along surfaced path

2) Opportunity to visit clay museum at discounted group rate

3) Road side parking at Tremena Road St Austell

4) Nice cafe at site for tea, cake, scones etc

We will be meeting at 10.00am for 10.05am departure for St Austell.

Please let us know by Saturday 23rd June if you would like to come, are able to offer transport and would like to visit museum. The museum trail will take about 1.5 hours and we hopefully will have a few in our group with experience of the industry.

Regards,

Chris and Janet


UPDATE 13TH JUNE 2018

REPORT ON WALK OF 12TH JUNE 2018

SALTASH-FORDER-ANTHONY’S PASSAGE-TREHAN-TREMATON-FORDER-SALTASH

 

Fourteen of us made their way to St Stephen’s Church in Saltash for the start of a 5 mile walk which was new to everybody except the walk leader of course!  The Cecil Arms, next to the church, is part of a community toilet scheme during its opening hours and this proved to be a useful facility at the beginning and end of our walk.

We walked westward down St Stephen’s Hill, a hill that we were not looking forward to climbing on our way back!  We then crossed Forder Bridge and, at the head of the creek, we gleaned much information about the area for an information board complete with map.  We looked forward to coming back to Forder Lake at the end of our walk for a welcome rest on the village green by this picturesque creek.

The walk has fine views of the Lynher and Tamar rivers as soon as you walk under the Forder Viaduct, a fine piece of Victorian engineering with granite piers supporting eight arches of engineering bricks.  It is one of fifty-one viaducts constructed on the Plymouth to Penzance railway line.  We gained even better views of the viaduct across the tidal pond by the tidal mill, now a private residence.



We reached Anthony’s Passage and walked past cottages and the harbour.  We took the footpath down to the beach and up some steps on a retaining wall.  From there we had excellent views of Ince Castle, a property that the U3A Garden Visit Group has visited in March 2018.  The harbour and beach are private property and unfortunately we could not spend any time there.  Stiles come in all shapes and sizes and further along on this walk you have to cross a gate stile. 


The path through woodland took us to a packhorse bridge at the head of another estuary where we decided that it was time to have our lunch break in the shade of the trees.

(Click on image above for larger view)


The walk continues through a beautiful meadow, a farm estate drive and then minor roads to Trehan, where we noted the ancient granite cross and then Trematon Castle.  The footpath past Trematon Castle back to Forder is full of wild garlic in May and although the plants had died back, you could still smell the garlic.  We had our second break on the village green at Fodder Lake and we could see one or two people pottering on their boats moored up in the creek.

 

We made it back up St Stephen’s Hill to our cars in time to avoid a few spots of rain.  As it turned out, we had been very lucky as, in Plymouth, they had had heavy rain in the afternoon.  Just one thing to add:  the walk leader had very clearly stated that there would be no food outlet on this walk. One member of the group found it hard to cope with this and asked two unsuspecting ladies, one reading her book at the old tidal mill past Forder and the other working in her front garden in Trehan whether they would serve a cream tea!  Can you guess who that was!?




UPDATE 2ND JUNE 2018


DETAILS OF WALK OF 12TH JUNE


SALTASH - FORDER LAKE - ST ANTHONY'S PASSAGE - TREMATON CASTLE - FORDER LAKE - SALTASH





  • A MODERATE 5 MILE CIRCULAR WALK WITH 7 STILES (ONE OF THOSE IS A SET OF STEPS HANGING FROM A METAL GATE) AND WITH MODERATE ASCENTS AND DESCENTS EXCEPT THE HILL BACK TO THE CARS WHICH IS STEEP
  • A MIX OF MINOR ROADS AND FOOTPATHS
  • COULD STILL BE MUDDY IN ONE OR TWO PLACES
  • MEET IN THE LOSTWITHIEL COMMUNITY CENTRE CAR PARK FOR A PROMPT 10.15AM DRIVE TO SALTASH
  • WE WILL PARK OUTSIDE ST STEPHEN'S CHURCH, SALTASH.   POSTCODE:  PL12 4AP, GRID REF SX417584 (OS EXPLORER 108)
  • NO PUBLIC TOILETS.  HOWEVER, WE CAN USE THE CECIL ARMS’  FACILITIES AT THE START/END OF THE WALK AS THE PUB IS PART OF A COMMUNITY TOILET SCHEME (THIS IS WHY I AM NOT STARITNG THE WALK EARLIER AS WE NEED TO WAIT FOR THE PUB TO OPEN TO USE THEIR FACILITIES)
  • NO FOOD OUTLET ON THE WAY BUT WE WILL STOP FOR A COFFEE AND CAKE BREAK (BRING YOUR OWN!)
  • BRING YOUR FOOD FOR A LATE PICNIC LUNCH IN FORDER ON THE GREE

PLEASE LET ME KNOW BY SATURDAY 9TH  JUNE WHETHER:

  • YOU WILL JOIN ME ON THIS WALK

  • WHETHER YOU ARE HAPPY TO OFFER A LIFT

I LOOK FORWARD TO YOUR COMPANY
ANNIE



UPDATE 31ST MAY 2018


  REPORT OF WALK ON THE 29TH MAY NEWQUAY EAST PENTIRE


Sixteen of us set off on the 9.00am train from Lostwithiel to catch the connection at Par for the train journey to Newquay-a pleasant 50 minute journey up through the Luxulyan Valley and through the clay mine areas and past the Goss Moor Nature Reserve to Newquay-all for £3.95 return with the help of group travel.

Arriving at the station we all piled out to find our first landmark-the old tramway track leading between two hotels. It was along this route that the minerals were carried after being transported by tramway from the south coast. At the end of the tramway we turn right and through an open grassed area overlooking the sea called Killacourt. All routes through the open space lead to Towan Beach and we turned left to go past Newquay West End Bowling Club and the a short detour to see the harbour. Newquay was evidently originally called Towan Blystra up until the 16th century when Bishop Lacey gave money for the construction of a new quay to provide a harbour-from this the new name of Newquay evolved. Next our first stop at an Artisan Coffee House-and very nice coffee it was too and although I didn't have anything to eat myself I was informed that that was good also.



Onward now we join the coast path and walk a little way before we see a white painted building called a Huer's Hut where a huer would scan the bay for shoals of pilchards approaching the shores during August-October and on seeing the fish would shout out 'Heva Heva' for the boats to take to sea. A good time for a group photograph.




We then kept to the coast path to pass the old lifeboat house and to the end of Towan Head where we see how many people can fit into the lookout shelter at the end of the head before returning with great views of Fistral Beach to the lifeboat house and the walk around the beach and through the sand dunes to a road in front of hotels and flats and then to a path going onto East Pentire Head, a car park and the opportunity to walk out on the headland and enjoy the views of Crantock Beach and The River Gannel.




With the full instructions past onto the walkers-”you must not be late back as the next train back to Lostwithiel is at 7.00pm and if you do catch it you will have to pay again as the group travel will no longer be valid”-we split into those who were having a picnic on the headland and those who were going into town to find a café or just stroll with the holiday makers enjoying a half term break.

3.00pm came and we all made it back to the station for our trip back to Lostwithiel:this turned out to be an adventure as we were told by the ticket collector that the train serving the Truro to Falmouth line had broken down so the next train from Penzance to Plymouth had been used instead meaning that our connection from Par to Lostwithiel was cancelled. Several of us had to get back on time so plan A was put into action with A and B ringing up their spouses so that C, D, E and F could get back to Lostwithiel and then E and F could collect their cars and go back for G,H,I,J,K,L,M etc. Thanks to all for thinking of and operating the plan.

That and the stimulating conversation was just too much for one of us!



I hope that we all got back in time for our other activities after our walk of 3.5-4 miles (taken from two local walk guides)-or was it?as those with clever machines suggested it was up to 7.1 miles.




*****************


UPDATE 17th MAY 2018


NOTICE OF WALK ON THE 29TH MAY

         TO NEWQUAY AND EAST PENTIRE HEAD

            (AND A GOOD DAY OUT)


1) 4 MILE CIRCULAR ROUTE USING COAST PATH,SAND DUNES,BEACH AND ROADS

2) WE WILL BE TRAVELLING TO NEWQUAY BY TRAIN FROM LOSTWITHIEL VIA PAR

CATCHING THE 9.00AM TRAIN FROM LOSTWITHIEL*** AND RETURNING ON THE 15.01 FROM NEWQUAY ARRIVING AT LOSTWITHIEL AT 15.58

3) AFTER AN EARLY/MID MORNING DRINK WE EXPECT TO FINISH THE WALK AT AROUND 1.00/1.30- TIME FOR LUNCH OUT, A PICNIC OR JUST BROWSE OR ENJOY THE SUN AND BEACH BEFORE CATCHING THE TRAIN HOME

****IMPORTANT. FOR THOSE CATCHING THE TRAIN AND COMING FROM THE TOWN DIRECTION IN LOSTWITHIEL PLEASE NOTE THAT A TRAIN GOING IN THE PLYMOUTH DIRECTION CAUSES THE CROSSING TO GO DOWN AT ABOUT 8.50 AND DOESN'T THEN OPEN UNTIL AFTER THE PENZANCE TRAIN HAS LEFT. SO BE EARLY.

PLEASE LET US KNOW BY MONDAY 28TH IF YOU ARE COMING AND WHERE YOU ARE CATCHING THE TRAIN.

REGARDS,

CHRIS AND JANET


UPDATE 10th MAY 2018

REPORT OF WALK  ON THE 8th MAY  - FROM LOOE TO POLPERRO AND BACK


With some new members and others going to meet us at Looe we gathered at the Community Centre at 9.45am and then to catch the 10.48am No 73 bus from Looe to Polperro on a day with some drizzle expected early on but with the hope that it would clear so that we could see those fantastic views promised.

With bus passes in hand for most of us we caught the reasonably full bus via Pelynt to Polperro and followed the leader through the town and up a hill, a bit like Bodmin Hill, until he decided that it was not the coast path and so we had to take another unknown path which zig zagged through a wood to that well known coast path-to the sound of “as his favourite walk he didn't know it very well”.

With the expected drizzle and sea mist we headed along the path with limited views.

out to sea and around Downend Point with Downend Rock just out to sea and using the diversion which has been in force ever since the storms to our dinner stop at Talland Bay. With the drizzle still coming down most of us took shelter either under the umbrellas or in the sweet little beach huts that the café have provided for diners.

This provided an ideal setting for one of our regular photos only to realise that two had gone shopping.


With the realisation by many of the group that we were only a third the way along the walk we set of again up the hill towards what is called Aesop's Bed off the coast comprising many rocks and around Hore Stone and Bridge Rocks before we could see St. George's or Looe Island. The weather as predicted improved and raincoats and jumpers removed as it became hotter and hotter. Time for another photo with all present, except for the author, to show the sunshine and Looe Island now owned and managed by The Cornwall Wildlife Trust.

https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/953/41979931552_a153c76195_b.jpg

(Click on image above for larger view)


With our destination in site we head along the coast path to our cars and for four lucky people it was a chance to have a drink and a light bite in the sunshine in the colourful café along side the tennis courts before heading home.





UPDATE 1st MAY 2018

NOTICE OF WALK ON THE 8TH MAY                    

FROM POLPERRO TO LOOE

ONE OF MY FAVOURITE WALKS WHICH WE COMPLETED IN SEPTEMBER 2016-SEA VIEWS ALL THE WAY, DRINKS AND CAKES AT THREE POSSIBLE LOCATIONS AND A BUS TRIP. SOME UPS AND DOWNS AS WOULD BE EXPECTED FROM COAST PATH

1) WE WILL CATCH THE 10.48 BUS FROM LOOE FIRE STATION TO POLPERRO SO WILL LEAVE THE COMMUNITY CENTRE AT 10.00AM SHARP

2) 4.5 MILE WALK STOPPING AT TALLAND BAY FOR LUNCH-PICNIC OR PURCHASED FOOD AND DRINK

3) CONVENIENCES AT POLPERRO, TALLAND BAY AND LOOE

PLEASE LET US KNOW  BY SATURDAY 5TH IF YOU WISH TO COME AND WHETHER YOU CAN OFFER TRANSPORT

REGARDS,

CHRIS AND JANET







UPDATE 25TH APRIL 2018

Report of a damp short circular walk from Lostwithiel to Milltown

Looking out of our window I wondered if anyone would turn up for a short walk to Milltown and back.

Arriving at the community centre we found 4 members of the walking group keen and raring to go. The route took us up Summer street  past the new housing development to the cemetery. Here we had to make a decision if to walk further up the hill and pick up the Saints way or turn left along the road directly to Milltown. The latter course was taken due to the inclement weather.

 The lane passes the private residence of Castle where it is rumoured Rudolf Hess was interrogated during WW 11.

Arriving at Milltown we bear left under the viaduct which was rebuilt in masonry around 1894 replacing a previous wooden structure which its support columns can still be seen. 

From here we return to Lostwithiel across fields and Coulson Park.

On arriving back in Lostwithiel we found ourselves drawn into the Globe Inn for refreshments.   A larger view of our intrepid walkers may be seen by clicking on the image.

  


UPDATE 18TH APRIL 2018

 NOTICE OF WALK ON THE 24TH APRIL

FROM LOSTWITHIEL TO MILLTOWN

1)  JANET AND I AND ANNIE ARE UNAVAILABLE TO LEAD A WALK SO DAVE AND CHRIS

HAVE VERY KINDLY AGREED TO STEP IN AND LEAD THIS SHORT 3.5 MILE WALK

2) AS USUAL WITH THE CURRENT WEATHER THERE IS SOME MUD AND A LONGISH HILL

TO START THE WALK ON MINOR ROADS AND FOOTPATHS INCLUDING THE SAINTS WAY.

3) COULD YOU MEET AT LOSTWITHIEL COMMUNITY CENTRE AT 10.25 FOR A 10.30 START

IF YOU COULD LET ME KNOW BY MONDAY 23RD IF YOU WISH TO GO ON THE WALK AND I WILL THEN PASS THE INFORMATION TO DAVE SO THAT HE KNOWS WHO TO EXPECT AND TRIES AND MAKE SURE EVERYONE ARRIVES BACK.

HOPE TO SEE YOU ALL FOR OUR NEXT WALK ON 8TH MAY 

REGARDS,

CHRIS AND JANET




UPDATE 12TH APRIL 2018

Report on the walk of 10th April 2018

A 7 miles circular walk from Feock to Devoran

Thirteen walkers put their trust in the weather forecast which has promised that the weather would brighten up as the day went on.  Well, this was a fairly accurate forecast although the “mizzle” made an appearance when we had our lunch break on the grassy quay in Devoran.

We had hoped to start our walk from Feock Church car park at about 11.00am.  It was important to have access to facilities at the start of our walk.  A phone call to the church warden led to a phone call to the lady in charge of the community centre bookings (as it so happens, she is a member of the Carrick U3A and their walking group!).  We were kindly invited to use the centre facilities and join the Tuesday coffee morning.  When we arrived, we noted that they had set up extra tables and chairs and even warmed up a few cups so we simply could not refuse!  We set off at 11.15am.

The walk is very accurately described in iwalkcornwall and navigates you to a crisscross of footpaths.  It takes you first from Feock to Devoran through Penpoll and then high above the estuary through fields from which you have stunning views of the Carrick Roads as far as St Anthony’s Head.



The second half of the walk takes you from Devoran back to Feock along the road which hugs the estuary, through Chycoose, Point and Penpoll from where you then make your way to Harcourt.  In Harcourt, you have great views of the other side of the estuary including of the Pandorra Inn. Some of the group decided to walk back to Feock whilst others did a one mile extension (there and back) to Restronguet Point.  You have great views of the estuary back to Point, the Pandorra Inn and Restronguet Passage.  It was interesting to look across at the footpath we had used during our November walk from Mylor Bridge to the Pandora Inn.

So what do we know about Feock and Devoran?

  • The earliest known record of Feock is in a 12th Century document where the settlement is referred to as Fioc.  It is also recorded in 1264 as Ecclesia Sancte Foece”.  The name is taken from a celtic saint to which the parish is dedicated, but little is known about, although it is generally assumed to be female.

  • The settlement at Devoran dates back to mediaeval times and the first record of it is form 1278 when it was spelled Deffrion.  However, until the end of the 18th century, Devoran consisted of a few farms and tin streaming works,  Stemming from its location on the confluence of two rivers, the name is thought to be based on the Cornish for water - dowr

Heritage plaques in Devoran and Penpoll give you an insight into the area’s industrial past. 

  • During the 19th century Devoran was engineered as an industrial settlement based around a port at the terminus of a new railway.  A town was planned and built which included the church built in 1855.  A major part of the trade was the export of mineral from the Redruth and Camborne area and the import of coal and timber for use in the mines.

  • The Redruth and Chasewater Railway ran to Devoran and Point Quay. And this is why that road is called The Old Tram Road.

  • Until the port of Devoran was built, Point Quay was the main docking point and the site of a Customs House and a smelting works.

  • There was a tidal mill in Penpoll

Well we might not remember any of the above but we will definitely remember the stunning views, the mud we had to wade through and the fact that the residents of Devoran care so much for their letterbox that they have knitted a blanket cover to protect it from the elements!







UPDATE 1 April 2018

NOTICE OF WALK OF 10TH APRIL 2018

A 6 MILE MODERATE CIRCULAR WALK FROM FEOCK TO DEVORAN


HERE ARE THE DETAILS:

  • OUR STARTING POINT WILL BE FEOCK CHURCH
  • STUNNING VIEWS OF THE CARRICK ROADS THROUGHOUT
  • THE FIRST LOOP OF OUR WALK WILL TAKE US FROM FEOCK CHURCH TO DEVORAN VIA PENPOLL USING MINOR ROADS AND FOOTPATHS, SOME MUDDY. THERE WILL BE 12 STILES!
  • WE WILL HAVE OUR PICNIC LUNCH IN DEVORAN. REFRESHMENTS AND TOILETS AVAILABLE IN THE LOCAL PUB ” THE OLD QUAY INN”
  • THE SECOND LOOP OF THE WALK BACK TO FEOCK VIA POINT, PENPOLL AND HARCOURT IS LESS STRENEOUS WITH NO STILES AND WE WILL WALK ON MINOR ROADS ALONG THE ESTUARY
  • OPTIONAL EXTENSION TOWARDS THE END OF THE WALK FROM HARCOURT TO RESTRONGUET POINT FROM WHICH YOU STAND OPPOSITE THE PANDORA INN (1 MILE THERE AND BACK)

WE WILL LEAVE THE LOSTWITHIEL COMMUNITY CENTRE CAR PARK AT 9.45AM IN ORDER TO START THE WALK BY 11.00AM

I WOULD BE GRATEFUL IF YOU COULD LET ME KNOW BY SATURDAY 7TH APRIL WHETHER:

  • YOU WOULD LIKE TO DO THIS WALK
  • YOU ARE HAPPY TO DRIVE AND PROVIDE A LIFT
Annie


UPDATE 28 MARCH 2018

REPORT OF WALK ON THE 27TH MARCH

TO HELLAND AND BACK”

This is a walk and title taken from a little book called “The Best of Bodmin Moor” Volume 2 one of the many walks we take from excellent published literature.

On a reasonable day with a bit of drizzle forecast but not enough to put this hardy bunch off the walk, particularly with the promise of a pub lunch after the walk. A great turnout of 20 walkers set off from the Camel Trail car park at Hellandbridge to walk the 4 mile circular route. Passing the old Wesley Methodist Church we headed up the slight hill towards Helland and its parish church of St Helena with Janet,at the front and Carol at the back, proudly wearing our Lostwithiel U3A reflective jackets.

In front of the church we find a war memorial and our walkers were asked to find a name of historical significance on the granite stone. Sue won picking out the name Bligh, of the same family that brought us Captain Bligh of Bounty fame, although it was thought he was born in the nearby St Tudy parish.

Most of  us visited the church with its chequerboard slate floor at the entrance and also were told of the historical significant and its part in the Prayer Book Rebellion of 1549. With some good views of Brown Willy and Roughtor we now headed eastward to Lower Kernick and continuing on the road in view of the muddy fields to a crossroads with a choice of route. As the author says we can either have no sense of adventure and continue on the road north or maybe battle through undergrowth and brambles but finding a lovely ancient lane. Some might have regretted it but we all chose the latter and had to battle over or under some fallen trees and also a stream flowing down the lane to get to the bottom of what looked like an old drovers lane.

To make it even more exciting we were also joined by a young heifer who was being rounded up by three farmers after going missing for 3 weeks. An action photo was obviously called for to mark the occasion.



Making it to the road and downhill to Shell Wood and the Camel Trail with a more normal formal photograph to capture all the participants.


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Click on image above for larger view


This takes us back the 1.5 miles to Hellandbridge and a short car journey back to the Borough Arms for our pub lunch.



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UPDATE 21 MARCH 2018

      NOTICE OF WALK ON THE 27TH MARCH

TO HELLAND AND BACK


1) 4 MILE RELATIVELY EASY CIRCULAR WALK USING CAMEL TRAIL, FIELDS AND  MINOR  ROADS WITH A FEW STILES

2)  NO SERVICES/FACILITIES ON ROUTE

3) PLEASE BRING DRINK IF YOU WANT AS WE WILL PASS A PICNIC SPOT ON ROUTE

WE WILL MEET AT COMMUNITY CENTRE AT 10.05AM FOR 10.10AM DEPARTURE HEADING FOR CAR PARK AT HELLANBRIDGE. PLEASE LET US KNOW BY SATURDAY 24TH IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO COME AND IF YOU CAN OFFER TRANSPORT.

PS  WE WILL BE STOPPING FOR LUNCH AT BOROUGH ARMS-PLEASE LET US KNOW IF YOU WOULD ALSO LIKE TO STOP SO I CAN TRY AND ARRANGE LIFTS TO SUIT

REGARDS,

CHRIS AND JANET


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UPDATE 14 MARCH 2018


REPORT OF WALK ON THE 13TH MARCH

FROM ROCK TO POLZEATH AND BACK


You would not believe as I sit typing this report with the rain lashing down and the wind blowing that 16 walkers set off yesterday in brilliant sunshine with hardly a

breath of wind to walk along the coast from Rock to Polzeath and to return inland.

After parking at the Council car park we headed along the coast with the tide almost fully out through the sand dunes following the waymarks to reach Daymer Bay with only one slight mistake. The views across the Camel estuary were magnificent with the ferry doing great business travelling over to Padstow on the opposite shore.

Continuing along the path we have great views of Stepper Point, affectionately know as “The Pepper Pot” the 40ft high stone tower daymark built in 1830 and which we all saw at close quarters on our recent walk around the point.

We were soon in Polzeath which comes from the Cornish words for “dry” and “pool/harbour” and time for picnic and drinks at the café on the beach and our regular photograph.


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Click on image above for larger view


Now fed and watered we turn inland past a site with mobile homes and onto the golf course at Roserrow and following the white markers and avoiding any golf balls as we cross the fairways to make our way across a stream and the start of the “muddy and wet” part promised in the notification of the walk with electric fences guarding the fields-but no sign of cattle in the wet conditions. Crossing a minor road we head across a ploughed field, with the tower of St Enodoc church as the guide, to reach the entrance and past the grave of St John Betjeman. The church dates from the 12th century and is said to lie on the site of a cave where St Enodoc lived as a hermit.

With such views of the church and the coast another photograph was taken.


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Click on image above for larger view


Our route now took us through another golf club that of St Enodoc Golf Club which was initially build in 1889 and improved in 1907 to the basis of what the course is today. Following the white marker stones and again avoiding any golf balls we make our way around the course and onto the path in the sand dunes, above the one we had used on the outward leg, and back to the car park with the sun still shining.



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UPDATE 5 MARCH 2018

  NOTICE OF WALK ON 13TH MARCH

              FROM ROCK TO POLZEATH AND BACK

1) 5.8 MILE CIRCULAR, RELATIVELY EASY,WALK STARTING AT PAY CAR PARK IN ROCK

2) FACILITIES IN ROCK AND POLZEATH

3) SANDY COAST PATH ON OUTWARD JOURNEY BUT MUDDY AND WET ON THE WAY BACK

4) PACKED LUNCH CAN BE TAKEN OR PURCHASED ON ROUTE

PLEASE LET US KNOW BY SATURDAY 10TH IF YOU CAN COME AND IF YOU CAN OFFER LIFT

WE WILL BE MEETING AT COMMUNITY CENTRE AT 10.00AM FOR 10.05AM START

REGARDS,

CHRIS AND JANET



UPDATE 27 FEBRUARY 2018

REPORT ON THE CIRCULAR WALK OF 27TH FEBRUARY 2018

St Veep Church to Cliff via St Cadix and Haye Farm and back through Manely and Pennant

Eighteen walkers dressed in many warm layers braved the “Beast from the East” to do this very local short circular walk, a walk which we did in glorious sunshine and sheltered from the wind most of the way. 

We started at St Veep Church and made our way across the field opposite the church where the Maiden Bells of St Veep were cast in the 18th century.  They are called maiden or virgin bells because they did not need any tuning whatsoever, a rare thing.   The mud had dried up nicely and we were able to make our way down two more fields to the minor road that leads to Haye Farm.    On the left through the bare trees, we had a very good view of St Cyric’s creek and the property known as St Cadix, a Grade II listed building from 1710, which stands on the site of an ancient Cluniac priory dissolved in 1536.  Little of the original building remains although some early carved stones have been excavated by one of the recent owners.

Past Haye Farm, we followed the footpath to our left.  We walked through two fields and climbed over a wall on our right.   There, we took time to stop and admire the views.  Ahead of us, we could see a group of buildings.  This hamlet is called Manely, one of the largest manors in Cornwall at the time of Doomsday.  On our far left, on the opposite bank of the river Fowey, we could see the village of Golant.  Still on the opposite bank of the river but moving our gaze towards the right, on the foreshore at the bend of the river, is a small building constructed as a plunge pool and boat-house.  It was built around the turn of the 20th century and reputedly visited by Edward VII when he was Prince of Wales.  You can see the river Lerryn as it flows into the river Fowey beneath St. Winnow point.  Upstream you see St. Winnow Church and the Tudor Barton House tucked into the hillside near the water’s edge.  Daphne du Maurier in her book “Vanishing Cornwall” makes the suggestion that this landscape may be the setting for the legend of Tristan and Iseult.  Her theory is based on the supposition that Castle Dore, the ancient hill fort on the ridge above Golant, was the palace of King Mark and that other place names also fit the legend. 

Going over a stile and down some steps, we walked through a gateway and followed the track down to Cliff.  Cliff, at one time, was well known for its plum orchards and market gardens. At the bottom of the track, we turn right into the narrow lane.  King Charles I was here in August 1644.  During the civil war, the parliamentary troops held the opposite shore and the King came here from Boconnoc to encourage his own troops.  They were stationed at Cliff to guard the ancient ford which crossed the River Fowey.   The owner of Cliff Cottage was out in his garden and showed us the two cannon balls embedded in the front wall of his house above the two windows.  These had been found in the area, a reminder of the battles that had taken place during the civil war.

We stopped in Cliff to have our morning break on a private terrace by the foreshore by kind permission of the neighbour!   We were sheltered from the wind and had superb views of Golant.  We could have stayed there all day but after 20 minutes, it was time to do the second loop of our walk.





We walked up the lane for about 100 yards and on the left, in front of Penfoye House, we took a footpath which took us down to the foreshore.  This footpath is probably the original track leading to the ford.   From the foreshore, we had an excellent view of the boathouse, St Winnow Church and St Winnow Point where the river Lerryn flows into the Fowey River.  We retraced our steps and turn left into the lane to make our way back to St Veep Church through Manely and Pennant.  From the fields after Pennant we had great views towards Polruan and the sea.

This moderate walk is approximately 3 miles long and lasted 2 hours 45mns including our break.


UPDATE 17TH FEBRUARY 2018

NOTICE OF WALK OF 27TH FEBRUARY

A 3.5 MILE CIRCULAR WALK FROM ST.VEEP CHURCH

 


HERE ARE THE DETAILS:

  • OUR STARTING POINT WILL BE ST.VEEP CHURCH

  • THE ITINERARY IS:  ST.VEEP CHURCH, HIGHER PENPOLL, ST CADIX, HAYE FARM, CLIFF, MANELLY AND BACK TO ST VEEP CHURCH

  • STUNNING VIEWS OVER GOLANT, ST WINNOW POINT AND ST WINNOW CHURCH.

  • INSTEAD OF FOLLOWING THE FOOTPATH AT THE BEGINNING AND END OF THE WALK, WE WILL USE THE MINOR ROADS AS THE FIELDS ARE EXTREMELY MUDDY

  • A MODERATE WALK : ONLY ONE STILE OVER A WALL BUT ONE STEEP FIELD ON THE WAY DOWN TO CLIFF AND TWO MODERATELY STEEP HILLS UP TO HAYE FARM AND BACK THROUGH MANELLY

  • TOILETS AT THE CHURCH AT THE BEGINNING AND END OF THE WALK

  • NO COFFEE SHOP (SORRY!). PLEASE BRING A HOT DRINK AND SNACK TO HAVE DURING A BREAK ON A QUAY BY THE RIVER FOWEY

  • NO QUIZ! BUT NO MINI EASTER EGGS!

WE WILL LEAVE THE LOSTWITHIEL COMMUNITY CENTRE CAR PARK AT 10.15AM IN ORDER TO START THE WALK BY 10.30AM AT THE LATEST.

I WOULD BE GRATEFUL IF YOU COULD LET ME KNOW BY SATURDAY 24TH FEBRUARY WHETHER:

  • YOU WOULD LIKE TO DO THIS WALK

  • YOU ARE HAPPY TO DRIVE AND PROVIDE A LIFT

I LOOK FORWARD TO YOUR COMPANY.

ANNIE




UPDATE 14TH FEBRUARY 2108

REPORT ON WALK OF 13TH FEBRUARY 2018

A 6 MILE CIRCULAR WALK FROM DUNMERE HALT TO GROGLEY HALT

 


One thing is for certain:  when you have been tasked with leading a walk, you become an avid, and concerned, watcher of the weather forecast!  The weather forecast had promised that the wintry showers would clear after 1.00pm with a reduced chance of precipitations. So, it was agreed to postpone the start of our walk from 10.30am to 12.00pm, a gamble which paid off since we walked in dry and sunny weather most of the time save for a sharp but short hail shower.   Twenty two walkers met up in the Camel Trail car park in Dunmere, had lunch in their respective cars and set off at 12.45pm.

This walk, curtesy of “iwalkcornwall.co.uk”, follows the opposite side of the river from the Camel Trail.  This was the most challenging part of the walk as the path is at first very narrow, close to the edge of the bank and it was vital that nobody fell in the cold and extremely fast flowing river Camel.  We all commented that we had never seen the river so swollen.  The other challenge on this short stretch was the mud.

At Boscarne (a number of Roman artefacts were found near Boscarne), we turned right and made our way towards Nanstallon where in the late 1960s, a first century Roman fort was excavated. Little remains now apart from some earth banks which are remnants of the ramparts.  Once in Nanstallon, we made our way to Ruthernbridge where we stopped for a group photo.  The bridge over the river Ruthern dates back to around 1450 and it is recorded in 1494 as Rothyn Brygge. A branch line was added from Ruthernbridge to join the Bodmin-Wadebridge railway at Grogley Halt and was opened in 1834.  The railway lasted exactly 100 years, closing in 1933.  The track was lifted in the following year.

We followed the track to Grogley Halt to an entry point onto the Camel Trail.  At Grogley Halt, we had our second stop, not just for another group photo but also for a quiz on the Camel Trail.  The only reason the group humoured their group leader is because they knew that if they gave a correct answer, they would get a mini Easter egg!  So what did we learn?

  • The Camel Trail starts at Padstow and ends at Wenford Bridge

  • It is 17.3 miles long

  • It is managed by Cornwall Council

  • 400,000+ visitors use it every year

  • The Bodmin and Wadebridge railway was built by Sir William Molesworth of Pencarrow

  • It cost £35,000 to build in the 1930s

  • The original use was to carry sand from the Camel estuary to inland farms to use as fertiliser

  • Later it was used to carry fish from Padstow to London and slate and china clay from inland quarries to ships in Padstow

  • The last passenger train to Padstow was in 1967

  • The last freight train was in 1983

  • The Cornish for River Camel “Dowr Camel” means Crooked River


 

We made our way back to Dunmere Halt walking past the Camel Valley vineyard which started in 1989 and continues to win many national and international awards.  We also walked past Boscarne Station which is at one end of the Bodmin and Wendford Steam Railway.

We had walked at a brisk pace and we were back at Dunmere Halt at 3.45pm.




UPDATE 3RD FEBRUARY 2018


NOTICE OF WALK OF 13TH FEBRUARY

A 6 MILE CIRCULAR WALK FROM DUNMERE TO GROGLEY HALT


HERE ARE THE DETAILS:

  • OUR STARTING POINT WILL BE ONCE AGAIN THE CAMEL TRAIL CAR PARK AT THE BUROUGH ARMS (PL31 2RA)
  • APART FROM SOME MUD AT THE BEGINNING OF THE WALK, THE REST OF THE WALK WILL BE DRY AS WE WILL WALK ON MINOR ROADS AND THE CAMEL TRAIL
  • THE ITINERARY IS:  DUNMERE HALT, NANSTALLON, RUTHERNBRIDGE, GROGLEY HALT AND BACK TO DUNMERE HALT
  • A MODERATE WALK : NO STILES BUT TWO MODERATELY STEEP HILLS IN THE FIRST HALF OF THE WALK
  • TOILETS IN THE PUB AT BEGINNING AND END OF THE WALK
  • NO COFFEE SHOP (SORRY!). PLEASE BRING A PICNIC LUNCH TO EAT DURING THE WALK.  YOU MIGHT CHOOSE TO HAVE A HOT OR COLD RINK IN THE PUB AT THE END OF THE WALK
  • THERE WILL BE A SHORT QUIZ TO TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE OF THE CAMEL TRAIL!

WE WILL LEAVE THE LOSTWITHIEL COMMUNITY CENTRE CAR PARK AT 10.30AM IN ORDER TO START THE WALK BY 11.00AM AT THE LATEST.

I WOULD BE GRATEFUL IF YOU COULD LET ME KNOW BY SATURDAY 10TH FEBRUARY WHETHER:

  • YOU WOULD LIKE TO DO THIS WALK
  • YOU ARE HAPPY TO DRIVE AND PROVIDE A LIFT

I LOOK FORWARD TO YOUR COMPANY.

ANNIE



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UPDATE 31 JANUARY 2018

REPORT OF WALK ON THE 30TH JANUARY

BODMIN AND THE CAMEL TRAIL AND OUR NEW YEAR LUNCH


Twenty of us keen walkers set off from the car park adjacent to the Camel Trail at Dunmere in weather which was dry but with various forecasts of rain to come;the main question was when and would we be back by the time it did?

The walk is a circular walk of about 3.8 miles and is in three parts, the Camel Trail, a short length of minor road and an area of woodland and river side.

After about 30 minutes of level walking we arrived at our drinks venue which was not spelled out in the notice of the walk but a clue given as somewhere were we “hoped we would not be detained too long”. Yes you've got it Bodmin Gaol.

All the activities and history are very well described on their web site: www.bodminjail.org. Many of us were not aware of the scope of the activities from the café and restaurant , the quiz and curry nights, the ghost nights and much more.

Bodmin Gaol was designed by Sir John Call and built in 1779 by prisoners of war and was operational for 150 years in which it saw over 50 public hangings. It was reputed to be the first British prison to hold prisoners in individual cells. The gaol closed in 1927 and since that date there has been no prison within the county of Cornwall. As most locals will know plans are in hand to give the prison new life as a hotel with scheduled completion in 2019.

We were all impressed with the café and I'm sure many of us will revisit the site again.

Both our photographs were taken at the jail, one showing us all gathered after our drink and the other showing one of our group making use of the facilities!.

(Click on image above for larger view)



Our only up hill followed on a minor road before we turned off the tarmac and past row on row of solar panels before heading down hill through mixed woodland with many newly planted specimens in evidence. Not long after the decent the River Camel and weir comes into sight which we follow on down past a new holiday cottage complex and then the main road and our finish and venue for our lunch.

The Borough Arms provided us with a private room all laid up for our now 17 strong group for an excellent lunch from an extensive menu. By about 2.15pm we were all finished and ready to go with the rain now coming down as predicted.

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UPDATE 18 JANUARY 2018

 NOTICE OF WALK AND "CHRISTMAS/NEW YEAR LUNCH

ON 30TH JANUARY THE CAMEL TRAIL AT BODMIN



1) 3.8 MILE CIRCULAR WALK ON CAMEL TRAIL, MINOR ROADS AND WOODLAND PATHS

2) RELATIVELY EASY WALK WITH ONE LONGISH STEEP HILL AND SOME MUD

3) WE WILL BE STOPPING FOR TEA/COFFEE AT 11.00ISH BUT HOPE THAT WE WILL NOT BE DETAINED TOO LONG!

4) A CHOICE OF LUNCH SUCH AS SOUP, FISH PLATTER, PIES AND MUCH MORE WILL BE AVAILABLE AT THE END OF WALK FOR THOSE WHO WISH TO STAY. IN ORDER TO ENSURE SUFFICIENT SPACES I NEED TO KNOW BY FRIDAY 26TH LATEST IF YOU WANT TO TAKE PART.

IF YOU DON'T THEN I WILL TRY  AND ARRANGE TRANSPORT BACK HOME FOR YOU BUT IT WILL DEPEND ON DRIVERS CHOICES.

5) WE WILL MEET AT COMMUNITY CENTRE AT 10.05 FOR 10.10 DEPARTURE

6) PLEASE LET US KNOW IF YOU WOULD BE ABLE TO OFFER TRANSPORT

REGARDS,

CHRIS AND JANET

PS WE WILL STILL BE HAVING LUNCH EVEN IF THE WEATHER IS TOO BAD FOR WALKING 


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UPDATE 10 JANUARY 2018


REPORT OF WALK ON THE 9TH JANUARY

AROUND THE ANCIENT AND LONELY DODMAN POINT


Eighteen of us braved the impending rain, which was forecast to start at 2.00pm, to walk the delightful 5.4 mile circular route using footpaths and the South West Coast Path around the Dodman with a stop off in Gorran Haven. This was a similar route taken on a walk in December 2014 but adding a bit more distance to avoid some muddy areas and to take in more of the coast path. Unfortunately a few members had to call off due to illness-we hope to see them again soon.

Parking at the National Trust car park at Penare we headed due west to meet to coast path just above Hemmick Beach at the far east of Veryan Bay with Nare Head visible at the far west with Gull Rock (again) just off shore. Walking now on the coast path we pass the western end of the Bulwark -a 600m long Iron Age earthwork 6m high in places which encloses Dodman Point creating a fortified area that would have contained iron age dwellings. Onto the Dodman-it was recorded on old local maps

as “Deadman”,hence the dark and brooding promontory connotation, and views of the granite cross come into view. This huge cross was placed there in 1896 as a navigational aid to seafarers and a good point to take our customary photograph-this can be compared to the one taken in 2014-spot the similar faces.

(Click on above image for larger view)

Opposite the path can be seen the watch tower a 1795 survivor of a series of Admiralty signal stations used to alert the Navy at Plymouth of any foreign shipping.

With many Dartmoor ponies also sharing the route we continue above the large sweep of Bow or Vault Beach with Cadythew Rock at its eastern end to find a sheltered nook for our well earned lunch stop-as some of the crew were feeling a little peckish. Continuing on the coast path with some muddy areas and some climbing to round Maenease Point we see views of Gorran Haven harbour and our next stop for hot drinks and chelsea buns, eccles cakes and doughnuts from the local shop sat outside under canvas with the sound of a slight drop of rain.

Fortunately by the time we were ready the rain had stopped and we proceeded out of town and turned left up another muddy areas to reach Treveague Farm and the then short walk back to Penare to arrive at about 2.30pm

On the drive back home it was evident that it had rained quite heavily further east and we considered ourselves very lucky to have had an excellent walk in the dry with magnificent views.




UPDATE 1 JANUARY 2018

     NOTICE OF WALK ON THE 9TH JANUARY

AROUND THE LONELY DODMAN


Veryan Bay
Photo Credit: Creative Commons (CC BY-NC 2.0) by
James Stringer


1) 5 mile circular walk of moderate difficulty taking in the ups and downs of part of the South West Coast Path.
2) Parking at the National Trust car park at Penare.
3) Cafe and toilet facilities at Gorran Haven.
4) Wonderful views, on a clear day, across Veryan Bay from this dark and brooding promontary.
5) Walk takes in coast path and inland paths which will be muddy-sticks advisable
6) Bring packed lunch and/or use cafe at Gorran Haven for our lunch stop.

We will meet at 10.15am at Community Centre for 10.20am start. Please let us know by Saturday 6th January if you wish to go on walk and if you are able to offer transport. 

Regards and Happy New Year

Chris and Janet











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REPORTS FROM THE FIRST  HALF OF 2017 AVAILABLE HERE

REPORTS FROM THE SECOND HALF OF 2017 AVAILABLE HERE




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