Walking


Contact: Chris & Janet Dimond
Telephone: 01208 871784

Email: chris.dimond(at)btinternet(dot)com or CLICK HERE




Main Walks (Normally 4-6 miles)
1 per month, on the second Tuesday of every month. Meeting point (for car sharing etc) at Lostwithiel Community Centre



Short Walks (Normally 3-4 miles)
1 per month, on the last Tuesday of every month. Meeting point at Lostwithiel Community Centre


For both Long and Short Walks please meet at the Community Centre  from 10.15a.m to leave at 10.30a.m.

Looking forward to seeing you all, plus volunteers as Walk Coordinators and any suggestions/ideas for our programme.

Future walk dates. Please let Chris or Janet ( 01208 871784) know if you would like to organise a walk.


REPORTS FROM THE FIRST  HALF OF 2017 AVAILABLE HERE


UPDATE OF 11TH OCTOBER 2017

REPORT ON WALK OF 10TH OCTOBER

A CEMI-CIRCULAR WALK FROM TRURO TO TRESILLIAN VIA MALPAS AND ST CLEMENT


Fourteen walkers made to trip to Truro for this 7 mile walk.  We parked in the free car park at Boscawen Park.  We walked through “Sunny Corner”, a riverside area of Truro kept very tidy and pretty by a group of volunteers known as the Sunny Corner Conservation Group. The tide was still in at the beginning of the walk which made the estuary look very picturesque.

Our first stop was in Malpas (Cornish: Moresk). It is here that the rivers Truro and Tresillian converge and the village is still a port with the navigable waterways to Falmouth and the sea. Malpas lies within the Cornwall Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB). Almost a third of Cornwall has AONB designation, with the same status and protection as a National Park. The Truro River from the city to the village form part of the Malpas Estuary SSSI (Site of Special Scientific Interest). It is an important habitat of tidal mudflats, which are feeding grounds for wildfowl and wading birds.

By a very happy coincidence, on the second Tuesday of the month, teas, coffees AND cakes are served in the village hall.  It was an offer to tempting to resist!   Malpas Village Hall must be one of the halls with the best views.   As we were enjoying our refreshments on the hall terrace, a double decker arrived carrying holidaymakers who were going to board the Enterprise boat for a river trip to Falmouth. Historically, the village is perhaps best known for its ferry service across the waterway to the Roseland and Tregothan estate. It is said that this is the crossing Iseult (from Authurian legend) made to King Mark's palace.  

Our second stop was in St Clement where the church is one of only three in the county with a lychgate.  Lychgates consist of a roofed porch-like structure over a gate, often built of wood. They usually consist of four or six upright wooden posts in a rectangular shape. On top of this are a number of beams to hold a pitched roof covered in thatch or wooden or clay tiles. They can have decorative carvings and in later times were erected as memorials.  In the Middle Ages, before mortuaries, and at a time when most people died at home, the dead were placed on a bier and taken to the lychgate where they remained, often attended against bodysnatchers, until the funeral service, which may have been a day or two later. The lychgate kept the rain off, and often had seats for the vigil watchers. Bodies at that time were buried in just shrouds rather than coffins. At the funeral, the priest conducted the first part of the service under the shelter of the lychgate.   

The churchyard contains an inscribed stone cross: the first word of the inscription is perhaps isnioc (later opinion believes ignioc).  The inscription is Ignioc Vitali fili Torrici (i.e. Ignioc son of Vitalus son of Torricus) and the dating is 5th to 7th century. Another inscription is in Ogham, perhaps partly in Irish.  The inscriptions are both older than the carving of the upper part into a cross.

We then walked to Tresillian.  Tresillian (Cornish: Tresulyan) is located at the tidal head of the Tresillian River. The name Tresillian is reputed to translate from the Cornish language as “a place of eels”, according to a 19th-century writer. However, modern toponymists generally agree that the name in fact, translates as “farm/settlement of a man called Sulyen” (a Celtic personal name from British: sulo-genos, “sun-born”).

On the way back to St Clement, we stopped for lunch at a lovely stop with 2 benches by a small waterfall.  

 

Back in St Clement, we walked back a different way towards Malpas on a permissive path which took us through woods along the estuary.  This meant that we were sheltered from the light drizzle which had started to fall.  It did not last and the rest of the walk was dry (although not underfoot as we had to go through many muddy patches on this walk).  Needless to say that once back in Boscawen Park, the group went to the café to enjoy a chat …and more refreshments.

I am afraid that I have to report that some of the walkers were spotted slacking during our walk....


UPDATE OF 2nd OCTOBER 2017

 

NOTICE OF WALK ON THE 10th OCTOBER 2017

A SEMI CIRCULAR WALK FROM TRURO TO TRESILLIAN

 


 

Here are the details:

1.    A 7 mile semi-circular walk from Truro to Tresillian via Malpas and St Clement

2.    A walk along the estuary, part of the Carricks Roads, with plenty of wading birds so bring           your binoculars and cameras

3.    The walk will be in 3 parts, all of them likely to be muddy so wear waterproof boots and wear        over trousers if you have any:

  • Fairly flat walk from Truro to Malpas where in the Village Hall on the second Tuesday of every month, they sell tea/coffee and cakes.  What a lucky coincidence!
  • Malpas to St Clement – some steep parts both ways with steep steps up and down  and 3 stiles on the way back.  Please bring your sticks.   We will stop at Malpas Church which is one of the very few churches in Cornwall to still have a lynch gate
  • St Clement  to Tresillian loop – a flat walk

4.  We will have lunch on benches on the way back from Tresillian and we can have more  refreshments once back in the car park in Truro

5.   There are public facilities in Malpas and St Clement

6.   We will park in the free car park in Boscawen Park on the road to Malpas

7.   We will meet outside the community centre at 9.35 am for 9.45 am departure.

8.    I would be grateful if you could let me know by Sunday 8th October if you would like to do this walk and if you are able to offer transport.

Kind regards

Annie



UPDATE 30 SEPTEMBER 2017

REPORT OF WALK ON THE 26TH SEPTEMBER   - REDRUTH AND MINING LEGACY


On another fine day sixteen of us caught the 10.07 train to Redruth to explore the old Cornish town and its surrounding countryside and learn more about its relationship to Methodism.

The name Redruth was gained from mineral mining as in medieval times the process of separating tin and copper from waste materials turned a local river blood-red with washed out iron oxide. The Cornish name for a nearby ford was Rhyd Druth the “red fort” and the village that grew around became Redruth.

Walking from the station we pass the Wesley Centenary Memorial Building and up Sea View Terrace and with the chimney stack of Pednandrea Mine (it was once 8 storeys high but has now been reduced to 4) in view and up to Sandy Lane and the Public Bridleway to Grambler Farm. Here the paths are muddy after all the recent rain but we all managed to negotiate successfully without mishap to follow the next path to Gwennap Pit.

We had given notice to the volunteers who run the Visitors Centre at the Pit that a group from Lostwithiel were to be expected but our expectations who surpassed as we had tables and chairs laid outside in the sun and excellent cakes and drinks made for us by two friendly staff who gave us valuable information about the Pit and the Busveal Chapel alongside. Our donations were thankfully received and a photograph duly taken for our records and theirs.

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(Click on image for larger view)


Gwennap Pit was possibly a hole created by mining activities which was first used for secular gatherings but soon became a sheltered venue for preaching and a favourite open air preaching venue for John Wesley who was taken to it in 1762. He preached at the pit on 18 occasions between 1762 and 1789.

Now owned by the Methodist Church since 2001 it is used today for special services, musical events and weddings in conjunction with the small chapel built in 1836.

The group climbed into the pit to have an other group photograph along side the two granite posts which were the alter for the services taken by Wesley.



Leaving the Pit we headed up gradually to the summit of Carn Marth and to one of the finest viewpoints in Cornwall and views over some of our recent walks at St Agnes Beacon, St Anthony Head, Dodman Point, Bodmin Moor and Falmouth Docks. An ideal lunch spot with the view and the flooded quarry and with the sun still shining and even more cake eaten to celebrate the imminent birthday of the writer.


From here it is downhill along rough tracks and lanes to the heart of Redruth and decisions as to which train to catch and what else to do.

Most went to look at the Tregellas Tapestries which show the story of Cornwall from prehistory to the modern day in 58 encapsulating tapestries.

The work took three years to complete and has been on display since 2001. One of the Tapestries depicts Lostwithiel and Restormel Castle and are well worth seeing on a visit to Redruth with its interesting Town Trail.

We all went to the local café, of which there is a good choice on the pedestrian main street, as one of our team had found out that the 15.17 train which most of us intended to catch had been cancelled so we had time before the 16.29.

Another good walk to a destination that not many had been to before.




UPDATE 18 SEPTEMBER 2017

  
NOTICE OF WALK ON 26TH SEPTEMBER

              MINES AND METHODISM AT REDRUTH

 

1) 4 MILE CIRCULAR WALK ON FIELD PATH, ROUGH TRACKS AND LANES. MUDDY IN PLACES WITH 6 STILES AND SOME MINOR HILLS.

2) WE WILL BE STOPPING FOR A PICNIC LUNCH; PLENTY OF PLACES TO GET TEA, COFFEE IN REDRUTH AT APPROPRIATE TIME.

3) WE WILL BE VISITING METHODISM'S FAMOUS OUTDOOR "CATHEDRAL" OF GWENNAP PIT

4) TRAVELLING BY TRAIN TO REDRUTH  10.07 FROM LOSTWITHIEL ARRIVES AT 10.53

5) TWO OPTIONS FOR RETURN 15.17 ARRIVING AT 15.58 AND 16.29 ARRIVING AT 17.14

MEET AT STATION TO CATCH 10.07 FROM LOSTWITHIEL.

IF YOU COULD LET US KNOW BY SATURDAY 23RD IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO COME.

REGARDS,

CHRIS AND JANET




UPDATE 15 SEPTEMBER 2017

REPORT OF WALK OF THE 12TH SEPTEMBER - WARLEGGAN AND ITS HISTORY


On a day forecast to be dry until about 5.00pm eighteen walkers were signed up for this walk of around 6 miles to be lead by John Keast, a resident of Warleggan all his life, who had volunteered to show us some of the history of the area but also to provide us with a cream tea at the end.

It will be impossible for this report to cover everything that happened, all the information given and tales told and even the route taken so it will be very much a skeleton with all eighteen of us with our personal memories and facts remembered.

Driving in convoy from Lostwithiel, although somebody did miss a turn, we headed through Mount to the well signed car park adjacent to the church to be met by our leader and after sorting ourselves out were soon heading north over Warleggan Down and towards Tor House, a house that had been in John's family for many years but that had been improved of late with an indoor water supply now installed.

Passing through the gate and up towards Carburrow Tor and over rocks and through bracken we were shown remains of a Cornish Long House, a bronze aged round house and told of medieval round houses which we all would have missed as just rocks in the landscape.


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Click on Image above for larger view


The first photograph in front of “another pile of stones” which are two mimics of Roughtor and Brown Willy many miles to the north but with very similar shapes.

Passing over rough and wet terrain we headed for our picnic lunch beside a flooded disused pit and a “container” holiday home-just right for that quiet honeymoon away from everything!

After lunch was very much about the mining industry where we learned about the tin mining with the associated arsenic production and the China Clay production at the former Glynn Valley Works crossing the infamous bridge twice. This bridge caused a dispute in the 1900's between the local councils of Warleggan and Cardinham.

The photograph shows that the bridge is still standing and worth that £4 15shillings repair bill.



At the China Clay works, the old manager's office now being occupied by marines, we saw the remains of the settling ponds, the dryers and the loading bays and further explanation from John A was very helpful.

Back across the bridge and comfort break for some we decided to head back to Warleggan rather than the Treveddoe Mine to have that cream tea as clouds started to form. Before that we had a quick look around the outside of the church named after St. Bartholomew with is new roof and seeing the different quality of masonry on each side of the church indicating the differing ages of construction and then inside to see the refurbished organ.

The vicar of the parish from 1931 until his death in 1953 was the Reverend F W Densham a gentleman who ended up preaching to no congregation except cardboard cut outs on the pews with names of past vicars written on them.

It is well worth reading more of this strange story or listen to John when he gives his presentation at various societies in the area.

Back then to an excellent cream tea supplied by Gill and John and to our cars after an excellent day out enjoyed by all and before rain came as predicted. faied they simply boycotted his services, and, each Sunday, he When this failed they simply boycotted his services, and, each Sunday, he would address a none existent congregation - resorting, it is said, to placing cardboard cut outs in the pews on which he wrote the names of past vicars. would address a none existent congregation - resorting, it is said, to placing cardboard cut outs in the pews on which he wrote the names of past vicars.


UPDATE 19 AUGUST 2017


REPORT OF WALK ON 15TH AUGUST  - AROUND ST. AGNES BEACON

On one of the best days in August with bright blue skies and constant sunshine twelve lucky walkers enjoyed a typical Cornish walk with stunning coastal views and inland woods and fields.

Although having to cope with a slight traffic hold up on the A30 we were soon nearing the village of St Agnes a prehistoric and modern centre for the mining of copper, tin and arsenic until the 1920's. Local industry has also included farming and fishing and more recently tourism.

We parked on the cliffs at Carn Gowla near the National Coastwatch Institution Lookout. These 300ft cliffs run south from the headland of St Agnes Head. Walking along the South West Coast Path we pass the little promontory of Tubby's Head, once an Iron Age settlement fortified by an earth embankment across its neck. From here we passed through what once was an industrial landscape, where the ruins of mine buildings stand as dramatic memorials to Cornwall's great era of mining.


One such building is the Towanroath engine house, the former pumping house for the Wheal Coates Mine, an ideal place for our first pictorial record.


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(Click on image for larger view)


Descending into the popular Chapel Porth Beach with many people in the surf we stop at the seasonal café for some birthday cake to celebrate Sue's recent birthday-the cake very kindly made by Anne.


After a suitable break we head up Chapel Coombe are are soon in delightful woodland with the odd property hidden in the trees. Out into the open again we walk for a short distance on a minor road before turning upwards alongside the entrance to

the Beacon Country House Hotel towards the Beacon. From its 630ft height we had great views around 360 degrees including St Ives along the coast. With such a view it was decided this was an ideal place for our lunch sheltered on the north side from the breeze .


Walking down again towards coast we noticed the burnt marks of an earlier gorse and heather fire. A fire which affected 5 hectares, an area equivalent to eight football pitches.

Back down to the coast path again and turning left towards the car park and our journey home



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UPDATE 4 AUGUST 2017

NOTICE OF WALK ON THE 15TH AUGUST

AROUND ST AGNES BEACON



1) 5 MILE WALK TAKING IN COASTAL PATH AND INLAND WOODS AND FIELDS

2) GREAT VIEW FROM ST AGNES BEACON-SEE PHOTO LOOKING TOWARDS ST IVES

3) BRING PICNIC IF  REQUIRED- CAFE AND TOILETS AVAILABLE AT CHAPEL PORTH BEACH

4) ONE MAJOR CLIMB UP TO BEACON

5) WE WILL PROBABLY PARK ON COAST PATH NEAR COAST WATCH STATION

WE WILL MEET AT COMMUNITY CENTRE AT 9.45AM FOR 9.50AM DEPARTURE.

IF YOU COULD LET US KNOW BY SUNDAY AUGUST 13TH IF YOU WANT TO GO AND IF YOU ARE ABLE TO OFFER TRANSPORT.

REGARDS,

CHRIS AND JANET



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UPDATE 31 JULY 2017

 ANNUAL WALK -ST WINNOW WAY MONDAY 28TH AUGUST

This walk, organised by our members Rob and Sue Wheeler and friends of Bradoc and St Winnow Church is a regular event and helps to raise money for both Bradoc and St Winnow Church Funds.

We start at Bradoc Church at 12.00 noon for everyone to enjoy their own picnic with tea, coffee or a cold drink being provided.

The walk starts at 1.00pm through the Boconnoc Estate and on to St Nectans Chapel where a splendid afternoon tea will be available to purchase-the funds going to the church funds.





St Winnow Photo by  U3A Member Robert Pittman (CC BY-ND 2.0)

After time to enjoy the refreshments we will carry on to St Winnow where the famous Angies' tea room will be open and we will be able to rest and await the shuttle service of cars to take us back to Bradoc.

We hope that you can make it on this lovely walk with the additional benefit of the excellent refreshments, good company and the charitable cause.

If there is sufficient interest I can organise transport from Lostwithiel.

Please let me know by 23rd August if you would like to go on the walk and if you want to share transport.

Regards,

Chris and Janet


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UPDATE 27 JULY 2017


REPORT OF WALK OF 25 JULY 2017 – TOTNES AND THE MIDDLE DART

Boarding Cross Country Rail’s Manchester train from a sun-bathed Lostwithiel Station augured well for our first walk abroad that was to begin with a train journey through East Cornwall and into South Devon – a welcome reminder of the South West’s beautiful scenery, not often viewed from the tranquility of a modern train. Following a brief stop in Plymouth to load the restaurant car, the train arrived on schedule and our fifteen would–be walkers alighted and walked up the steep hill to the top of Totnes Fore Street, passing the castle on the way; one of the best preserved examples of a Norman Motte & Bailey Castle in England (The subject of a second trip, perhaps?). Agreeing to meet at the bottom of the Fore Street, the group dispersed to reconvene an hour later having fed and watered themselves and created the desire to return at a later date to view the many individual shops in more detail.

The walk proper started from the lowest bridging point on the River Dart where the gravel path followed the river to arrive at a weir defining the highest navigable point, adjacent to a disused Dairy Crest Creamery; originally the site of one of Brunel’s pumping stations for the Atmospheric South Devon Railway built in 1857. A wooden footbridge crossing a drainage ditch over a leat, which once supplied water to power a number of waterside industries and at the same time drained the marshes, afforded our first photo opportunity.




A short distance later we arrived at the gates of The Dartington Hall Estate, headquarters of the Dartington Hall Trust, a charity specializing in the arts, social justice and sustainability. Purchased in 1925 by Dorothy & Leonard Elmhirst they set about refurbishing and redeveloping the whole estate using Dorothy’s not inconsiderable inheritance and established a number of commercial enterprises to support it, many of which survive today. The trust runs 16 charitable programmes , including Schumacher College and The Dartington International Summer School, in addition to developing and promoting  arts and educational programmes, acting as hosts to other groups and as a venue for retreats. The hall itself is a grade 1 listed building and the gardens a Grade II* listed in the National Register of Historic Parks & Gardens.

At least one of our number could have made a home here!



Our purpose, however, was to enjoy a walk round the estate and so, after a walk through the courtyard, a brief look in the main hall and a stroll through the formal gardens we left by a gate at the top, glimpsing the Tors of Dartmoor on the horizon, before descending the hill, passing the Dartington sports grounds on the way to arrive at the Cider Press Centre for a look at the shops and a cup of tea.

Our route continued along a gravel path beside the river and on the fringe of rising woodland, passing the site of the original 1938 Tweed Mill with its working water wheel, to return to the lodge gate by which we entered the estate.

Retracing our steps along the river bank took us to Totnes railway station and the IT training that ensued. As Lostwithiel station has neither a ticket office nor ticket machine and the morning train had apparently been ticket-collector-less we had been unable to obtain tickets on the outward journey. Honest citizens that we are, since Totnes ticket office was also closed, we set about obtaining 15 independently funded tickets from the single machine on Totnes platform. This took more than half an hour, the last of us obtaining a ticket just as our train pulled into the station! As this train was also ticket-collector-less apparently, we were left wondering whether honesty really was the best policy!

On the whole a most enjoyable day out with excellent weather and a most interesting venue. The only thing missing? Chris, our regular leader who was unavoidably detained on the day, but is to be congratulated on his careful planning and detailed instructions!


Our time on the platform at Totnes did permit one member of the group to explore any blood relationship that may have existed with his double.






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UPDATE 11 JULY 2017

  WALK ON 25TH JULY

 

  DUE TO BAD WEATHER FORECAST THE WALK SCHEDULED TO TAKE PLACE ON THE 11TH   JULY WILL NOW TAKE PLACE ON THE 25TH JULY.

  DETAILS OF THE WALK WILL BE AS SHOWN PREVIOUSLY.

  FOR THOSE WHO WANT TO COME WE WILL SEE YOU AT LOSTWITHIEL STATION TO  CATCH THE 10.45AM TRAIN TO TOTNES.

  IF YOU WANT TO JOIN US CAN YOU LET US KNOW BY SUNDAY 23RD JULY.

  REGARDS,

  CHRIS AND JANET


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UPDATE 5 JULY 2017

 NOTICE  OF WALK ON 11TH JULY

             THE MIDDLE DART AND A DAY OUT

 THIS WILL BE THE ONLY FORMAL WALK IN JULY AND WE SHALL ALSO BE DOING ONE ON 15TH AUGUST AND THEN REVERTING TO 2 PER MONTH IN SEPTEMBER.

 

1) A 5 MILE CIRCULAR WALK STARTING AND FINISHING IN TOTNES

2) WALKING ON SURFACED PATHS AND LANES BETWEEN TOTNES AND DARTINGTON

3) IT FEATURES ONE OF DEVON'S HISTORIC TOWNS, A REBUILT MEDIEVAL HALL, CLASSIC 20TH ARCHITECTURE AND A CRAFT CENTRE

4) WE WILL BE TRAVELING BY TRAIN FROM LOSTWITHIEL WITH TRAIN TIMES AS BELOW:-

       LOSTWITHIEL   DEPART    10.45AM     ARRIVE TOTNES    12.14PM

       TOTNES            DEPART    16.54         ARRIVE LOSTWITHIEL   18.13

          OR                 DEPART    17.17         ARRIVE       "               18.37PM

COST OF DISCOUNTED FARE   £9.20-(GROUP DISCOUNT SHOULD BE AVAILABLE)

6) TIME TO BROWSE IN TOTNES AND PLENTY OF CAFES, EATING PLACES OR BRING YOUR OWN.

5) PLEASE NOTE THAT WE HAVE NOT DONE THIS WALK AND SO ROUTE MAY BE FLEXIBLE!

 

WE WILL MEET ON UPLINE PLATFORM FOR 10.45AM TRAIN. IF YOU COULD LET ME KNOW BY SUNDAY 9TH IF YOU ARE COMING.

REGARDS,

CHRIS AND JANET

 

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UPDATE 5 JULY 2017


REPORT OF WALK ON THE 27TH JUNE - AROUND ST. MAWGAN


After a few last minute enforced changes only 10 of us set off for the short drive to

St. Mawgan, an attractive village with an imposing 13th century church, a craft shop, a village store and tea room, a pretty school and The Falcon Inn all clustered together in the delightful wooded Vale of Mawgan.

The village is today home to Newquay Airport the long runway being built for RAF St Mawgan.

As expected we arrived at the tea room at 10.58 and with only 2 minutes to opening we all decided to have a drink or cake before starting our 4.5 mile circular walk.

Passing the lych-gate of St Mawgan-in-Pydar church we start our walk. Set in the Vale of Lanherne( the alternative name for the valley) the church was endowed by the Arundells who lived there from 13th to 18th century. 

In 1794 the Arundells gave their Manor House, the imposing building behind the church, to the Camelite nuns to use as a convent. Today an enclosed community of Franciscan Sisters live there still guarding the relics of St Cuthbert.



The route then takes us westerly along side the River Menalhyl, past a grand stone farm buildings and over the river, where we stopped for our posed photograph, and back on the northern side towards St Mawgan again and passed some imposing newer properties all with balconies looking over the valley.


Stopping some people returning to the café or pub we then started on our second loop and climbed above the village looking for our turning right - at this point our two leaders where in some doubt that they were going the right way despite some frantic map reading - we did indeed find the turn towards Lawrey's Mill and past some refurbished old building towards the river again and to a patch of ground that we could all sit and have our packed lunch.



The photograph taken during the meal shows that we had to put our rain coats on as we had the first real rain of the day. It didn't last long and we were soon on our way back to the car park and home before it did really rain.



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UPDATE 22 JUNE 2017

NOTICE OF WALK ON 27TH JUNE
      CIRCULAR WALK AROUND ST MAWGAN


1) 4.5 MILE CIRCULAR ROUTE ON FOOTPATHS AND MINOR ROADS

2) TWO FAIRLY STIFF CLIMBS AND A FEW STILES BUT OTHERWISE RELATIVELY EASY

3) NICE TEA ROOMS WITH GARDEN OPENS 11.00AM-3.00PM

4) WALK TAKES ABOUT 2.5 HOURS SO BRING PICNIC IF REQUIRED/DESIRED

5) WALK STARTS AT FREE CAR PARK BEHIND FALCON INN.

WE WILL MEET AT COMMUNITY CENTRE AT 10.10AM FOR 10.15AM DEPARTURE

IF YOU COULD PLEASE LET US KNOW BY FRIDAY 23RD JUNE IF YOU WISH TO COME ON WALK AND IF YOU CAN OFFER TRANSPORT.

REGARDS,

CHRIS AND JANET




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REPORTS FROM THE FIRST  HALF OF 2017 AVAILABLE HERE




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